Beipanjiang 2003 Bridge/Page 2

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Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Beipan River gorge in 2008. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Beipan River gorge in 2011 with the new reservoir. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com



This 2006 view shows the vertical limestone cliffs that are typical of the mountains in Guizhou Province. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A view of the Beipan River in 2011. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Food vendors serve snacks and drinks on the southeast side in this 2006 view. An entire vendor village had formed on the northeast side in 2011. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


There are many tunnels along the highway on both sides of the bridge. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Georges.


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A 2006 view before the reservoir formed. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A 2011 view with the reservoir beneath the span. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The highway continues to gain elevation as it heads west to Xingyi in this 2006 view. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A view from 2011.Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The elevated viaducts from which the previous images were taken are more then 400 meters above the river.



Image by www.anshun.gov.cn


Sometime in 2009, a reservoir formed beneath the bridge from a downstream dam.


Large highway signs showing big local bridges are a common site throughout China. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A satellite view from around the year 2000 shows the new highway under construction with the Beipanjiang bridge crossing in the center.


A view of the Beipanjiang River gorge about 2 miles (3 kms) upstream of the bridge. You can faintly see the suspension bridge towers in the upper right. The footbridge you see in the foreground is for the construction of a new arch bridge that bypassed the stone arch bridge from 1961. This bypass was necessary as a dam was completed in 2009 and flooded the river valley beneath a deep reservoir. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The older road to Huajiang crossed the Beipanjiang River on this stone arch bridge from 1961. The bridge was finally closed sometime in 2010 when a new concrete arch bypassed it with a main span of 459 feet (140 meters). Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The replacement arch was constructed by forming the two halves of the arch on falsework built high up along the hillside. The two halves were then rotated out over the river on August 24th of 2009. The Chinese are the only bridge builders in the world that still use this innovative technique.



The two arch halves are held back by cables that pass through the concrete pier and down to the base.


The massive concrete piers are slowly rotated using an old fashioned pulley system.






Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The suspension bridge can just barely be seen from the new concrete arch crossing. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A trek to the Beipanjiang River gorge would not be complete without a visit to the original 1898-built chain suspension bridge near Huajiang. This unusual type of catenary suspension bridge is unique to China. The main span measures 213 feet (65 mtrs) and is accessible from a parking area. You must descend hundreds of feet down into the gorge to reach the historic crossing. The most famous of China's classic chain suspension spans is the Luding bridge in Sichuan Province.

Hopefully this classic chain bridge will survive for generations to come. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The chains are mostly hidden beneath the deck planks. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Beautiful writings were carved into the cliffs at the far end of the bridge. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The chain bridge had become somewhat dilapidated after the reservoir formed beneath it in 2009.


This entry has 2 pages: 1 | 2
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