Siduhe River Bridge/Page 2

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A large rock monument celebrates the successful construction of the bridge with a photo of the unusual pilot line rocket launch that was done for the first time ever in 2006. The technique was used again in 2011 for the Lishuihe Bridge in nearby Hunan Province. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Due to the remote, inaccessible river canyon, the engineers decided to experiment and instead of using a blimp or helicopter to drag the first pilot line across the gorge, they used a rocket. Over 3,281 feet (1000 meter) of tether was attached to the back end of a 4 foot (1.5 mtr) long rocket and blasted across the deep river gorge. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by cnhan.com


A diagram of the rocket with more than a 1,000 meters of bundled line. Image by www.cnhubei.com


A drawing of the path that was engineered for the rocket launch.


Engineers test the rocket with several boxes of tether. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by Xinhua.


Image by www.cnhubei.com


Regional newspapers reported the unique rocket launch. Image by Hubei Government


Image by www.cnhubei.com


A pulley system drags across one of the first cables in the fall of 2006. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by Hubei Government


The catwalk is nearly complete in late 2006. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


A series of pulley supports and wheel rollers is installed prior to the cable wire spinning. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


127 wires are grouped into bundles that will eventually be compacted into one huge cable composed of thousands of wires. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


A bundle is moved into position. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


A compactor compresses the bundles together tightly before steel bands are wrapped around the entire cable. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by www.enshi.cn


Steel clamps are installed at intervals where vertical suspender cables will hang from them to support the weight of the truss deck. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by www.enshi.cn


The temporary highline anchorage. The cables pass over the top of both bridge towers and allow the movement of the truss members to be carried out over the gorge. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


The central truss clamp locks the main cables to the 900 meter long deck truss to ensure that the steel expands and contracts evenly at the expansion joints located at either end of the truss directly beneath the towers. Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


East tower expansion joint. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


West tower expansion joint from below. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by Hubei Government


Image by www.enshi.cn


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Siduhe deck truss cross section.


Precast deck sections await placement. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image from Road and Bridge Southern China Engineering Co., Ltd. Power Point Presentation.


Image by www.cnhubei.com


Image by Georges.


The main cables are anchored within a deep mountain tunnel. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A saddle holds the thousands of wire strands in a hexagon shape. The process of suspension bridge construction has changed very little over the last 75 years. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The wires are grouped in bundles that descend more than 130 feet (40 meters) underground. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Georges.


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com



Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The main span is slightly longer than the Tacoma Narrows bridge in the U.S. state of Washington. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A construction view from 2008. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The tower in 2011 with bridge photographer Georges. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A construction view of the bridge and gorge from 2008. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A similar view from 2011. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


A group photo from our 2011 trip with Roger Perrin, Interpreter Ian Chen and driver Mr. Chen. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Truss assembly staging area in 2008 near the west tower. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


The staging area in 2011 showing the abandoned buildings that once housed dozens of bridge workers. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Roger Perrin contemplates the West entrance of the 3,550 meter / 2.2 mile long Baziling tunnel. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Baziling tunnel East entrance. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Several viaducts lead up to the East entrance of the 3,550 meter / 2.2 mile long Baziling tunnel. Image by Eric Sakowski / HighestBridges.com


Click on Page 3 for more Siduhe Construction Views and Diagrams!

This entry has 3 pages: 1 | 2 | 3
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